[Video] Exactly When And Where Will The Falling Space Station Hit Earth This Weekend?

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According to the map above provided by the European Space Agency, Malaysia is also within the potential re-entry area for the falling Tiangong-1.

That band of re-entry points β€” between 42.7 degrees of latitude north and 42.7 degrees south β€” also includes China, Africa, southern Europe, Australia and South America.

However, the National Space Agency (Angkasa) has issued a statement that the probability of the space station falling on Malaysian soil is estimated at just 0.09 per cent

Angkasa has been monitoring it since 2017 and is working together with the National Security Council to prepare for any eventualities.

Estimates from international agencies tracking the falling space station are now looking at it making landfall on April Fools Day itself.

However this is not a prank as the The European Space Agency, the California-based Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies (CORDS) have variously predicted the crash sometime between March 31 and April 1, Space.com reports.

In this picture picture released by Fraunhofer Institute FHR, the shape of China's falling space station Tiangong-1 can be seen in this radar image from the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques near Bonn, Germany. Pic: FHR/ APIn this picture picture released by Fraunhofer Institute FHR, the shape of China's falling space station Tiangong-1 can be seen in this radar image from the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques near Bonn, Germany. Pic: FHR/ AP

The 9-ton spacecraft, which is reported to be about the size of a school bus was launched in September 2011 to run tests for technology needed for an even larger, multi-module space station to be built in the 2020s.

The station was decommissioned back in March 2016 and was spotted to be on a trajectory headed for re-entry into earth since last year.

An official statement from China's state-run Xinhua news service has downplayed any catatrostrophic scenario as often depicted in science-fiction movies.

"There is no need for people to worry about its re-entry into the atmosphere. It won't crash to the Earth fiercely, as in sci-fi movie scenarios, but will look more like a shower of meteors," xinhuanet.com reports.

Aerospace Corp., a California-based research group that monitors all goings-on above Earth via its Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies concurs.

β€œThe overall risk to an individual from re-entering debris is extremely small compared to the other hazards we face. It is estimated to be less than a 1 in 1 trillion chance that a particular person will be injured by falling space debris. By comparison, the risk of being hit by lightning is 1 in 1.4 million, and the risk that someone in the U.S. will be killed in a hurricane is about 1 in six million,” the aerospace authority said in a public advisory.

Tiangong-1 which means 'heavenly palace' in English is now a big chunk of space junk that will likely burn up as it literally falls from the heavens sometime this weekend. You can watch the live feed of the event here.

- mD